ABSTRACT

The mouse has emerged as the primary animal model system for human breast cancer.  The murine mammary gland is similar in structure and function to the human. The TDLU and LA have similar morphology. The mouse, infected by MMTV, develops "spontaneous" tumors with specific but limited tumor phenotypes.  The advent of genetic manipulation has created many mice  that develop tumors with unique phenotypes. The unique patterns observed in the transgenic mammary gland are comparable to hyperplasias and tumors found in the human mammary gland. Even experienced pathologists have difficulty distinguishing between lesions from the two species. The morphological similarities reinforce the utility of the mouse models in understanding human breast cancer. This essay reviews our experience with the histopathology of human and mouse mammary disease. The histology of normal, hyperplastic, dysplastic and neoplastic lesions is compared
 
THE SLIDE PRESENTATION GIVEN AT THE AACR MOLECULAR AND PATHOLOGY OF NEOPLASIA: A WORKSHOP ("CANCER CAMP") JULY 17, 1997 IN KEYSTONE CO. CAN BE FOUND BY CLICKING HERE.
An audiovisual presentation of the talk given by Drs. Wellings and Cardiff at NCI can be found by clicking here.

Note about the illustrations. Many of the following are digital images or drawn from either (1) whole mounts of subgross preparations stained with hematoxylin at low pH (so that only nuclei are colored), or (2) from routine histology slides stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The drawings permit representation of the full three dimensional field that is often impossible with the limited depth of focus with a camera. All drawn illustrations closely represent the subject as observed in the morphological preparations. The magnifications are shown as units of length marked directly on the drawings. The terms "acinus" and "alveolus" are synonymous. The medium for the drawings is pen, black ink and gray tone watercolor wash. The images were taken with a Kontronic camera and digitized using Adobe Photoshop.
 

PLATE 1 PANEL 1 
PLATE 2 MICROPANEL 1
PLATE 3 PANEL 2 
PLATE 4 PANEL 3 
PLATE 5 MICROPANEL 2
PLATE 6 MICROPANEL 3
July 15, 1998